ARTInfo: Slow Art Day Fights Visual Grazing With a Deep Dive Into Museums

by Kyle Chayka
Published in ARTInfo: August 17, 2012

2001 study showed that visitors to the Metropolitan Museum looked at individual works of art for an average of just 17 seconds at a time, a visual habit called “grazing.” Even the most iconic artworks in the world can’t seem to hold our attention: The Louvre discovered that visitors look at the Mona Lisa for just 15 seconds on average. In the age of the moving image and endlessly updated World Wide Web, works of art in more traditional media don’t get the focus they deserve. Slow Art Day, a three-year-old initiative currently ramping up for its 2013 event, is looking to change all that with an orchestrated long art-viewing session at museums around the world.

Read the full feature article on ARTInfo

Comments on “ARTInfo: Slow Art Day Fights Visual Grazing With a Deep Dive Into Museums

  1. Pingback: Slow Art « The Woo Woo Teacup Journal

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