Slow Art Day 2017 at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Host Rachel Massey at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park writes of their Slow Art Day 2017 experience,

“YSP launched Mindful Moments on Slow Art Day, inviting 10 people to a private one hour viewing of Tony Cragg’s A Rare Category of Objects. Participants were invited to focus their attention on five specially selected sculptures and given cards with guidance and suggestions for mindful viewing – they were encouraged to close their eyes on arrival and before departing from each art work, allowing time for the experience to settle, perhaps noticing sensations in their body to help ground them in the moment.

Invitations for ways to view the work included, “Notice the edges of the piece. Take time to trace the edges with your eyes. Move very close to the piece and look slowly. Move further away – what do you see now?”

The atmosphere in the gallery was tranquil, yet there was a sense of intent focus and quiet energy. People moved reverentially around the space, but felt comfortable to lie on the floor, crawl around and under sculptures, move their bodies in response to the shapes.

This was followed with a delicious breakfast of tea coffee and pastries in the restaurant and conversation about the experience.”

Visitor feedback:

“Slow Art Day at YSP was truly the best way to start the weekend. We’re spending the day here, and we will do it differently after that.”

“If I’d gone on a normal visit I wouldn’t have even looked at that sculpture. Now I feel a real connection to it and it’s my favourite one.”

“All my ideas about the work changed as I looked at it longer.”

“A great privilege to have this private experience with a sculpture.”

Slow Art Day 2017 in Turku, Finland

Host Pauliina Nyqvist of the Wäinö Aaltonen Museum of Art in Turku, Finland writes of their Slow Art Day 2017 experience:

“Our Slow Art Day went well, even though there was only few attendants. We took a close look at a small selection of sculptures by iconic Finnish artist Wäinö Aaltonen and had some eye-opening discussions. We added our own touch to the Slow Art Day program by giving the option to draw the sculptures while looking. That appeared to be a very good idea.”

Works by Wäinö Aaltonen highlighted in Slow Art Day 2017 at the Wäinö Aaltonen Museum of Art.

Slow Art Day 2017 by the Numbers

Slow Art Day 2017 at the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium. Belgium was home to 11 Slow Art Day events, the most in any country after the US, with 5 in Antwerp alone.

Another Slow Art Day has come and gone! We loved seeing and hearing all about your experiences this year and hope you’ll join us again for Slow Art Day 2018 (on Saturday, April 14)!

Although the Slow Art Day team is based out of the United States, and got its start at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, we’ve been thrilled to see Slow Art Day spread around the globe and flourish across continents. Every year we have fun tallying up the total number of events as well as the countries, cities and states represented on our host list. So without further ado, Slow Art Day 2017 by the numbers:

As every year, we’re enormously grateful to our dedicated and engaged host community. Without their hard work and efforts, Slow Art Day would not be possible.

Slow Art Day 2017 in Brussels

Host Lieve Raymaekers at BOZAR in Brussels, Belgium writes of their Slow Art Day 2017 experience,

It was again (our second) great experience. Very mindful and peaceful, joyful…We started with a group meditation of 5 minutes around a Pol Bury fountain. We walked in silence throughout the exhibition before starting the slow looking exercises. The guides used hourglasses to measure the time and bell to mark the beginning and end of each exercise. The participants chose works themselves to look at. Most works of Pol Bury move very slowly and in unexpected ways. They invite you to look slowly and take your time. The drawing exercise – choose one work to draw (what you see, feel, imagine…) for 10 minutes – worked very well. The discussions after each exercise and at the end (we took 2 hours) were very inspiring.
Some quotes:

– When you look slowly you’ll remember better what you’ve seen
– Slow looking helps to better understand the artist
– When you look at less works you see more
– The experience of Slow Art Day makes the experience of the visit of the exhibition so much more interesting than when it’s “just another exhibit you’ve seen”
– When you take your time to look you can feel emotions coming up

Slow lookers at BOZAR, Brussels. Image © Amélie Detienne.

Slow Art Day at the Butler Institute of American Art

Host Maggie Kamenitsa at the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, Ohio, writes:

We just wrapped up our first Slow Art Day—it was great! Our new docent class did a great job as they took several guests around to discuss the works of art. So many people left saying, “I would have never noticed that before,” or “I really enjoyed just taking my time.”  It was a hit and we so look forward to doing this every year!

Read more about the Butler Institute’s Slow Art Day event in local newspaper The Vindicator here.

Happy Slow Art Day!

Happy Slow Art Day to all of you across the globe!

If you’re posting on social media, don’t forget to use the hashtags #SlowArtDay and #SlowArtDay2017.

We look forward to seeing your pictures and hearing about your experiences today.

Slow lookers and drawers at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart

Slow lookers and drawers at a Slow Art Day event hosted by Kunstzeichnen at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart (photo credit: Karolina Fabelova, Kunstzeichnen)

 

Slow Art Day 2017 in Shanghai

Host Joan Lueth at FQ Projects gallery (and the host of this year’s only Slow Art Day event in China) writes of their slow looking experience this year:

Checking in from Shanghai after another fabulous Slow Art Day experience! We gathered in an old neighborhood of fast disappearing houses, due to rapid development, in a typical 1920s Shanghai lane house now converted into FQProjects gallery featuring emerging artists. Viewing the works of Shanghai artist Wang DaWei, we entered into his world of mixed media paintings reflecting on living on the outside of community in a new neighborhood. As one participant Raymond Bu said, ‘I feel a happiness about the art even though the people seem alone. I grew up in a house just like this until I was 15 years old. It brings nostalgia to me inside the house and inside the paintings’. Thanks for another terrific event in a special and unique location! Best of luck from Shanghai to all those waking up to their Slow Art Day!  Zhi Yi (best wishes!)

Slow lookers at FQProjects in Shanghai

Slow lookers at FQ Projects in Shanghai

Slow lookers at FQProjects in Shanghai

Slow lookers at FQ Projects in Shanghai

Philadelphia Museums’ Plea to Visitors: Slow Down!

The Philadelphia Enquirer / The Barnes Foundation

“Come to a gallery, sit with it for a while, absorb the works there. It’s like listening to a great piece of music. Looking at a really good work of art over and over again, you begin to see it differently.”

Excellent advice from William Perthes, senior instructor at The Barnes Foundation, in the Philadelphia Inquirer‘s great article on Slow Art Day at Philadelphia museums. In addition to the Barnes, The Fabric Workshop and Museum and Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens are also hosting events this Saturday!

Read the full article here.

On ikonoTV, Everyday is Slow Art Day

Get ready for Slow Art Day in your area and train your eyes on ikonoTV.

Our partners at ikonoTV say:

“ikonoTV reinforces the idea of art as a universal language. Bringing art into everyone’s home, we invite our audience to take time and surrender to its beauty. Our expert team of curators and animators produce slow-art-clips narrating art without using words, a purely visual experience creating a deep connection between the viewer and the work of art.

Slow down, today and every day, and let art become part of your life: Switch on your smart TV, iPad or computer and turn your screen into a beautiful moving canvas thanks to the 24/7 stream.”