Philadelphia Museums’ Plea to Visitors: Slow Down!

The Philadelphia Enquirer / The Barnes Foundation

“Come to a gallery, sit with it for a while, absorb the works there. It’s like listening to a great piece of music. Looking at a really good work of art over and over again, you begin to see it differently.”

Excellent advice from William Perthes, senior instructor at The Barnes Foundation, in the Philadelphia Inquirer‘s great article on Slow Art Day at Philadelphia museums. In addition to the Barnes, The Fabric Workshop and Museum and Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens are also hosting events this Saturday!

Read the full article here.

Slow Art Day & the BBC

It’s hard to believe how much Slow Art Day has grown and spread across the world since its inception in New York a mere 8 years ago. We’re looking forward to having 170+ venues from dozens of countries participate in Slow Art Day 2017. Slow Art Day has had a large presence in the UK since the beginning and this year venues from the National Gallery to the Ashmolean Museum are organizing events – so we were extremely excited to see this feature in BBC Culture on the slow art movement. Filmed at Art Basel Hong Kong, reporter Linda Kennedy discusses the merits of slow looking with a variety of artists and art critics.

Belgian artist Luc Tuymans in the BBC "How to Look at Art" video.

Belgian artist Luc Tuymans in the BBC’s “How to Look at Art” video.

Watch the full video here!

The Slow Pleasures of Looking at Art – Cincinnati CityBeat Feature Article on Slow Art Day

by Steven Rosen
Published in CityBeat: April 2014

“Usually, I feel pressured to look at everything in a specific gallery (or, if out-of-town, an entire museum) and that inevitably means spending too little time with the life’s work of so many talented, creative people. That’s what Slow Art Day is attempting to remedy.

Rather than a Slow Art Day, there should be an ongoing Slow Art Tour. I’d come once a week.”

Read the full feature article on the Cincinnati CityBeat website.

New York Today: Their First 100 Days, Too – New York Times Article featuring Slow Art Day mention

by Annie Correal and Andy Newman

April 11, 2014

“Slow down, it’s Slow Art Day at six city galleries (and more than 200 others around the world). The concept: Look at five artworks for 10 minutes each, then meet and discuss.”

Read the full article on the New York Time’s website here.

Slow Art Day and the value of spending time looking at pictures – Image Source Interview with Phil Terry, founder

by John O’Reilly
Published in Image Source: April 11, 2014

“But what’s interesting about Slow Art Day is that it offers a practice (look for at least 10 minutes) and the possibility of an experience that’s owned by the viewer. It’s why giving attention to art at the very least brings new perspective, and is in the words of business thinkers potentially ‘disruptive’ in that it can over time shift how you see things.”

Read the full interview on the Image Source website.

Is it Art? Museum visitors invited to decide for themselves – Dothan Eagle Article featuring Slow Art Day mention

by Peggy Ussery
Published in Dothan Eagle : February 2014

“Beginning Feb. 25, the museum will begin hosting a series called “Is it Art?” and asking visitors to join a conversation about why a piece of art is art.

The series is based on Slow Art Day, an international art appreciation event held in April that the Dothan museum began participating in two years ago. Visitors come into museums, spend an extended period of time just looking at a work of art and then stick around to talk about it…”

Read the full feature article on the Dothan Eagle website 

Slow Me The Way – Manhattan Magazine Feature Article on Slow Art Day

by Tom Clavin
Published in Manhattan Magazine: December 2012

Don’t race through that museum tour: Take your time, take it easy, and take it all in. At least, that’s what the Slow Art movement would like you to do. Here, Tom Clavin explains the burgeoning campaign…

Read the full feature article on the Manhattan Magazine website 

ARTInfo: Slow Art Day Fights Visual Grazing With a Deep Dive Into Museums

by Kyle Chayka
Published in ARTInfo: August 17, 2012

2001 study showed that visitors to the Metropolitan Museum looked at individual works of art for an average of just 17 seconds at a time, a visual habit called “grazing.” Even the most iconic artworks in the world can’t seem to hold our attention: The Louvre discovered that visitors look at the Mona Lisa for just 15 seconds on average. In the age of the moving image and endlessly updated World Wide Web, works of art in more traditional media don’t get the focus they deserve. Slow Art Day, a three-year-old initiative currently ramping up for its 2013 event, is looking to change all that with an orchestrated long art-viewing session at museums around the world.

Read the full feature article on ARTInfo

Introducing the ‘slow art’ movement; it’s like the ‘slow food’ movement, with art (and food)

For a few moments, the event acquired a six-men-of-Indostan quality.

The abstract painting by Reed Danziger, exploding with colors and shapes, brought to mind a collage, said a painter and teacher of Hebrew from Israel. An artist from Brooklyn demurred. There was so much going on—it gave her the sense of standing in front of a manifesto, she insisted. Surely it resembled a film strip, argued a painter from Long Island City.

The artists were gathered at McKenzie Fine Art gallery in Chelsea on Saturday for Slow Art Day, an annual event during which art lovers visit local museums and galleries to look—slowly, deliberately, and thoughtfully—at pre-selected works, and then repair to lunch to discuss the experience.

 

Read the Full Article