Slow Art Day Tips from the Rubin Museum

Rubin Museum of Art

Rubin Museum of Art

The Rubin Museum of Art in New York is hosting a Slow Art Day event for the third year in a row, and they have some expert tips for you to bring with you to your slow looking experience on April 8. Their advice?

Take longer — and longer — looks
Look at a piece for 5 seconds then turn around and write down five things to describe it. Do the same thing again looking for 10 seconds, then 20.
Back-to-back drawing
In this partner exercise, two people stand or sit back to back. One person faces the object and describes it to the second, who draws it.
Ask yourself questions
Some questions Sloan recommends you can ask yourself for deeper looking include: What is the first thing you notice about this artwork? Does this make you think of anything that you’ve seen before? What do you see that makes you say that?

Read the full article on AM New York here.

Slow Art Day and the All Stars Project

In November, Slow Art Day founder Phil Terry partnered with the All Stars Project to bring a group of youth and community members to El Museo del Barrio in New York for a day of slow looking and discussion.

Phil writes, “Museums and art are for everyone – not just the few. Slow Art Day and the All Stars Project, Inc. are working together to help more people learn how to look at and love art – how to walk into a museum and not feel intimidated, to approach art as if we are all included because we are.”

Check out photos from the visit below!

Ready, Set, Still Life?!

© ROB AND NICK CARTER/COURTESY ROYAL PICTURE GALLERY MAURITSHUIS, THE HAGUE (via www.artnews.com)

© ROB AND NICK CARTER/COURTESY ROYAL PICTURE GALLERY MAURITSHUIS, THE HAGUE (via www.artnews.com)

The Frick’s new exhibition “Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Hals: Masterpieces of Dutch Painting from the Mauritshuis” features an enlivened version of Ambrosius Bosschaert’s Vase with Flowers in a Window.

Artists Rob and Nick Carter created the work by creating a time lapse-like video loop version of the work; complete with changing light, weather fluctuations, and life-like snail exploring the space.

If only more works actively called on the viewer to look slowly and repeatedly!

Read more about Rob and Nick Carter’s Transforming Still Life and the Frick’s exhibition currently on view here.

– Karen