Tate Modern Slow Art Day 2019: ‘Fantastic’

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According to the visitor experience team at Tate Modern, Slow Art Day 2019 was “fantastic.”

Participants slowly looking at The Snail by Henri Matisse

They organized two one-hour slow looking sessions split between two artworks and, then, after the sessions, the team invited the visitors to come together for tea, coffee, biscuits, and a discussion about the whole experience.

Here’s what some of the participants said:

“A really interesting session. I’m more mindful of how to observe art in the future.”

“What a wonderful idea!

“I understand now how you can spend so much time in a gallery looking at art!”

“The combination of looking at art slowly and with other people is a real eye opener.”

“Really like the concept. As someone who can feel a bit intimidated by the art world this felt like a really nice way in and gives me more confidence to engage with art in the future.”

“A brilliant concept, lovely to think that this is going on all around the world.”

“I will definitely bring friends next time. Do it again!”

“I felt like a part of a group/community and was an hour well spent.”

“We can’t wait for next year to do it again,” said Adriana Oliveira, Visitor Experience Manager there at Tate Modern.

Phil

Shanghai Slow Art Day 2019 ‘fascinating, thoughtful…’

Shanghai was one of the first Slow Art Day 2019 events to kickoff. We received their report at 4am NYC time (4pm Shanghai time).

Joan Lueth, a longtime host and art teacher in Shanghai, said, “The work of artist Yang YuanYuan engaged viewers with visual inquiries into the question ‘where is home?”

The event was “fascinating, thought-provoking and well-received.”

More reports coming soon including a few photos from my reprise of the first Slow Art Day in 2009 at MoMA in NYC.

Phil

Slow Art Day 2017 in Shanghai

Host Joan Lueth at FQ Projects gallery (and the host of this year’s only Slow Art Day event in China) writes of their slow looking experience this year:

Checking in from Shanghai after another fabulous Slow Art Day experience! We gathered in an old neighborhood of fast disappearing houses, due to rapid development, in a typical 1920s Shanghai lane house now converted into FQProjects gallery featuring emerging artists. Viewing the works of Shanghai artist Wang DaWei, we entered into his world of mixed media paintings reflecting on living on the outside of community in a new neighborhood. As one participant Raymond Bu said, ‘I feel a happiness about the art even though the people seem alone. I grew up in a house just like this until I was 15 years old. It brings nostalgia to me inside the house and inside the paintings’. Thanks for another terrific event in a special and unique location! Best of luck from Shanghai to all those waking up to their Slow Art Day!  Zhi Yi (best wishes!)

Slow lookers at FQProjects in Shanghai

Slow lookers at FQ Projects in Shanghai

Slow lookers at FQProjects in Shanghai

Slow lookers at FQ Projects in Shanghai

Slow Art Day Shanghai 2016 ‘Wonderful’

Check Instagram for all the amazing photos coming in from around the world for Slow Art Day 2016 – https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/slowartday.

In the meantime, Slow Art Day Shanghai just reported via email (Instagram is not available in China):

We had a wonderful experience with Shanghai artist Li WenGuang in attendance. We asked the artist to speak to us AFTER we had an extended encounter with his artworks.

He was so interested in our unfiltered experience with this works.

The 1933 Contemporary Gallery features young, undiscovered talent like Li WenGuang.

It was a GREAT event in Shanghai once again – we were all entranced.

– Joan Lueth

slowartday in Shanghai 1