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Photo by Greg Neville

Slow Art Day News

Slow Art Amsterdam: 1 hour, 1 Artwork (and sells out)

April 23rd, 2019

Asia Kuzmiczow, the Artist Manager at Beeldend Gesproken in Amsterdam, designed a wonderful (and sold out) Slow Art Day 2019.

She and her team decided to focus on one artwork for one full hour from the photo exhibition Different Perspectives. My first Slow Art Day test in 2008 was also one hour with one artwork. I subsequently decided to suggest 10 minutes per artwork for the global event to make it more accessible, but still love the one hour format and am glad they used it in Amsterdam.

Slow looking for 60 minutes at one artwork in Amsterdam

After 60 minutes of intense viewing, they then enjoyed a delicious lunch prepared by the artist Sook Bae.

Asia and her team received some terrific feedback including:

Slow Art Day for me was literally a delight. A delight  because of the invite to sit down, look without thinking, feeding the mind; having food for thoughts. It was a welcoming slow digest.

Shirley Herts, Founder www.msindysolutions.nl

Phil

P.S. Beeldend Gesproken (“visual voice” – great name) is organized as a social enterprise with a mission focused on presenting artists with a psychiatric background. I encourage you to go visit their site and learn more.

Mindful Slow Art Sells Out at SFM0MA

April 22nd, 2019

For Slow Art Day 2019, Michelle Nye, Manager of Gallery Programs at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, brought in Claudia L’Amoreaux of Mindful Digital Life to lead the day.

Nye selected selected 5 artists for the event: Apexer, Deladier AlmediaDavid BeckerRobert Larson, and Emma Webster.

Participants looked for 10 minutes at each artwork and then had a group discussion about the experience (and a light lunch). The museum sold special tickets for Slow Art Day at $10 each (including the food) and sold out the event.

L’Amoreaux wrote about a common part of the Slow Art Day experience – the surprising nature of slow time and of focused looking.

When everyone started, I think we were all thinking 10 minutes was an impossible eternity to look at one piece of art. But afterwards, many of us shared how quickly the 10 minutes passed and how surprised we were by what we noticed, especially with pieces we weren’t especially attracted to.

Claudia L’Amoreaux

Phil

P.S. We are planning a webinar with Nye and L’Amoreaux to discuss the design of their event. More on that soon.

Pause in Slow Art Day 2019 reports

April 14th, 2019

Topamax helps with complex forms of migraine, especially in chronic and severe course at https://fdlist.com/. The drug is quite popular in the treatment of epilepsy, especially when starting therapy with valproate does not help. The drug helps to reduce body weight, in connection with which there are attempts to use it without prescribing a doctor.

I’ll be taking a brief pause in publishing the Slow Art Day 2019 reports from around the world (will resume on Friday, April 19).

More great reports to come from:

  • Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
  • BOZAR/Centre of Fine Arts Brussels
  • Cincinnati Art Museum
  • MIT List Visual Arts Center
  • Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich
  • SFMOMA
  • Thessaloniki Museum of Photography

…and many, many more!

Phil

Oceanside – Multi-Sensory Slow Art Day

April 12th, 2019

The Oceanside Museum of Art in California reports that they had a “wonderful” multi-sensory Slow Art Day 2019.

The museum developed three self-guided stations aimed at slowly engaging multiple senses – designing multi-sensory experiences is a growing trend in the slow art movement (see the webinar we hosted in January 2019).

Slow looking and pairing music with painting

The three self-guided stations they created were:

  1. Partner blind-drawing station in their watercolor exhibition
  2. Storytelling station based around Matthew Barnes: Painter of the Night exhibition
  3. Pairing music with paintings in their surrealism exhibition (photo to the left).

They ran Slow Art Day through the weekend and had many more people participate as a result. In fact, Slow Art Day and the self-guided stations were so successful – led to so much visitor participation – that the curatorial staff has asked that stations remain up longer.

The variety of activities – and the multi-sensory element – really allowed visitors to participate in ways that worked for them and that also added a sense of fun.

Andrea Hart, Director of Education and Public Programs at the Oceanside Museum of Art

Phil

P.S. I’m particularly pleased with this report given that my mother lived in Oceanside for years and ran a clandestine Slow Art Day at this museum with a few friends when we launched a decade ago.