Tate Modern Slow Art Day 2019: ‘Fantastic’

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According to the visitor experience team at Tate Modern, Slow Art Day 2019 was “fantastic.”

Participants slowly looking at The Snail by Henri Matisse

They organized two one-hour slow looking sessions split between two artworks and, then, after the sessions, the team invited the visitors to come together for tea, coffee, biscuits, and a discussion about the whole experience.

Here’s what some of the participants said:

“A really interesting session. I’m more mindful of how to observe art in the future.”

“What a wonderful idea!

“I understand now how you can spend so much time in a gallery looking at art!”

“The combination of looking at art slowly and with other people is a real eye opener.”

“Really like the concept. As someone who can feel a bit intimidated by the art world this felt like a really nice way in and gives me more confidence to engage with art in the future.”

“A brilliant concept, lovely to think that this is going on all around the world.”

“I will definitely bring friends next time. Do it again!”

“I felt like a part of a group/community and was an hour well spent.”

“We can’t wait for next year to do it again,” said Adriana Oliveira, Visitor Experience Manager there at Tate Modern.

Phil

Reflections from Hosts: di Rosa

A note from di Rosa host Michael F McCauley:

Slow Art Day 2014 at the di Rosa (Napa, CA: www.dirosaart.org) was the second year we participated. Again this year, the group of participants was intimate – all the better to share observations. And again I was the docent/guide for our slow art lookers. I chose a mix of mediums – two sculptures, two works on paper, and one painting. After viewing these works, we had a picnic lunch on property – the day was sunny and mild — and we discussed what we had seen, including whatever surprise element we had noticed by looking slowly. Given those basics, we’re now thinking about customizing our approach for next year. The recommended 10 minutes of slow looking without discussing seems too long. Next year, we’ll likely spend 7 minutes looking and 3 minutes discussing at each work. We’ll lunch and chat about what we saw, as we did this year. But because it is difficult to recall specifics about each work, after lunch we’ll return to the galleries for an additional viewing of each work. This will reinforce the discussion and likely open up new insights based on everyone’s observations. We’ll still follow the basic structure of Slow Art Day, but alter it to accommodate our somewhat unique situation. (Visitors to the di Rosa Collection may not return to the galleries without a docent/guide.) We’re looking forward to next year and hope to include more participants.

Notes From Hosts: Tonianne Wyner

notesfromhosts
The Gold & Treasure Coast Chapter of Slow Food USA will once again host international Slow Art Day, Sat. April 12, 2014.
Again this year, we will host a U-Drive tour of the permanent public art collection.
Lists & map of public art will be available on our FaceBook page……..Slow Food Gold & Treasure Coast.
Participants are invited to gather at Heathcote Botanical Gardens where Slow Food will host a MadHatter’s Tea @ 3PM
no charge for the map or tour.
Tea is $25 and includes admission and tour of the botanical gardens, great Teas, tea treats & a free raffle ticket on 1 of 4 fabulous “FaerieArtBirdhouses” by Palm Beach artist Laurie Tuttell
– Tonianne Wyner

Notes From Hosts: Joanna Essen

notesfromhosts

Compton Verney Art Gallery situated in Warwickshire, England will be hosting slow art day for our second year. We were thrilled to take part in 2013, with an important movement allowing engagement at your own pace.

This year we will be providing a trail to highlight parts of our six permanent collections and have invited a local Kineton Thai Chi group to run sessions throughout the afternoon in our ‘Capability’ Brown Landscape.  
We will also be celebrating our 10th  anniversary year as an Art gallery and attempting to break the world record for the longest line of bunting. Visitors will be able to take part at their own leisure and make paper flags for the line of bunting.
We are also encouraging participants to take part at home and send them to us.
 
Follow our social media sites for progress on the world record attempt and activities happening on Saturday 12 April.
 
Kind Regards
Joanna Essen
Sign up to participate at the Compton Verney for Slow Art Day 2014 here!
– Karen

The Countdown Begins…

It seems like only yesterday we were kicking off Slow Art Day 2013 last April. Now we’ve come full circle yet again for an exciting day of art discovery.

With over 180+ venues already, participants can join the worldwide movement in any number of locations – from Adelaide, Australia to Yountville, California.

We heartily invite you to make 2014 your first slow looking experience. There’s no better time to start than now.

Keep apprised of our preparations by checking our facebook page, tumblr blog, and twitter feed for more updates.

“See” you all soon.

– Karen

 

Dig into Slow Art Day

A new education-based movement called “Deeper Learning” is proposing an alternative to educational styles featuring a skill us slow looking aficionados already know well: undisturbed, passionate study.

Emma Lloyd - "Emergence" Find this and other works on our Pinterest page!

Emma Lloyd – “Emergence”
Find this and other works on our
Pinterest page.

The concept of Deeper Learning is defined as “a rich learning experience for students that allows them to really dig into a subject and understand it in a way that requires more than just memorizing facts” according to Katrina Schwartz, of KQED’s Mind/Shift blog.

This kind of advocation for “digging into” something applies well to the slow looking philosophy. Instead of glossing over a work of art to see every item in a museum’s collection, Slow Art Day invites the viewer to stop and find inspiration within only five pieces for at least ten minutes at a time. The results are spectacularly diverse as seen in our well-documented catalog of slow looking experiences.

Scharwtz proposes that for the Deeper Learning model to catch on, it would help for educators to see it in action first before implementing within their classrooms.

Don’t have a handy Deeper Learning optimized classroom to bring the educator in your life too? Why not bring them along to a Slow Art Day event in your area!

This April, start the discussion around alternative ways of education and art experience.

– Karen