Tate Modern Slow Art Day 2019: ‘Fantastic’

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According to the visitor experience team at Tate Modern, Slow Art Day 2019 was “fantastic.”

Participants slowly looking at The Snail by Henri Matisse

They organized two one-hour slow looking sessions split between two artworks and, then, after the sessions, the team invited the visitors to come together for tea, coffee, biscuits, and a discussion about the whole experience.

Here’s what some of the participants said:

“A really interesting session. I’m more mindful of how to observe art in the future.”

“What a wonderful idea!

“I understand now how you can spend so much time in a gallery looking at art!”

“The combination of looking at art slowly and with other people is a real eye opener.”

“Really like the concept. As someone who can feel a bit intimidated by the art world this felt like a really nice way in and gives me more confidence to engage with art in the future.”

“A brilliant concept, lovely to think that this is going on all around the world.”

“I will definitely bring friends next time. Do it again!”

“I felt like a part of a group/community and was an hour well spent.”

“We can’t wait for next year to do it again,” said Adriana Oliveira, Visitor Experience Manager there at Tate Modern.

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Happy Slow Art Day!

Happy Slow Art Day to all of you across the globe!

If you’re posting on social media, don’t forget to use the hashtags #SlowArtDay and #SlowArtDay2017.

We look forward to seeing your pictures and hearing about your experiences today.

Slow lookers and drawers at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart

Slow lookers and drawers at a Slow Art Day event hosted by Kunstzeichnen at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart (photo credit: Karolina Fabelova, Kunstzeichnen)

 

Follow Your ‘Nose’…

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Our latest Pinterest board is so tantalizing that you’ll want to feast your eyes on these scrumptious combinations of art and food.

Once you get your artsy foodie fix, be sure to follow us on Pinterest to see more delightful finds from the Pinterest Universe!

– Karen

You Can’t Pin Us Down…

By MadeByBride (via Etsy c/o Pinterest)

By MadeByBride (via Etsy c/o Pinterest)

…Except on Pinterest!

Get ready for Slow Art Day 2014 by browsing our Pinterest boards, featuring some of the most thought-worthy slow looking quotes and eye-catching works to view slowly.

And while you’re there – don’t forget to relive the Slow Art Day 2013 memories in our special Board of our venues’ highlights!

We’re still dipping our toes into the Pinterest pool, so why don’t you stop by our latest nook of the internet and follow us while we’re ‘under construction’ ? No hard hats required.

– Karen

Slow Art Day and the Art of Social Media

As the very first intern to join the Slow Art Day team back in August of 2012, I’ve seen the social media strategy for our organization evolve from the ground up. From completely revamping our Tumblr page, to becoming active again on Facebook and Twitter, we’ve grown our online presence exponentially in just over a year, thanks to our hard-working social media team of just under 10 interns and volunteers.

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One our strongest beliefs at Slow Art Day is that art is truly for everyone, and our social media channels reflect that. Our Facebook page provides a daily dose of interesting artwork into your newsfeed, while our Tumblr blog showcases not only art by well-established names, but also features young and emerging artists who submit their work for our weekly “Tumblr Thursdays.

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We’re planning some exciting contests and giveaways in the future, so make sure to stay up to date on all our social media channels, whether we’re welcoming and announcing new venues on Twitter, sharing host reports and interviews on our blog, or posting thought-provoking and inspiring pieces of art on our Facebook and Tumblr.

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If you like what you see, feel free to drop us a line – we always love feedback!

Alie Cline
Social Media Manager

Twitter, tumblr, and Slow Art: oh my!

If you follow Slow Art Day on our various social media channels, you might have noticed an interesting conversation unfolding this week over whether programming like Slow Art Day can succeed in today’s fast-paced, digital environment. It all started when Sarah Bailey Hogarty from the de Young & Legion of Honor Museums looped us into a conversation happening at the 2013 Museums and the Web Conference:

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Of course, we had to respond!

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Which opened the floodgates for more dialogue and opinions from both sides:

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While twitter is fantastic for short, 140 character thoughts, we wanted to address our thoughts on the power of slow looking in a longer format, so our Social Media Manager Alie Cline took to the Slow Art Day tumblr to respond to Koven Smith’s initial concerns about Slow Art. Focusing on the ideas of slow looking and engagement, the post details how Slow Art Day can work within digital culture, “…so people can share their insights, observations, and engage with the artwork in a way that reaches beyond just the initial reaction of “I like this” or “I don’t like this.” Make sure to check out the entire post on our tumblr!

We love the thoughtful and respectful dialogue that took place on our social media channels – make sure to follow Slow Art Day on Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr for more conversations like this one!