Tate Modern Slow Art Day 2019: ‘Fantastic’

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According to the visitor experience team at Tate Modern, Slow Art Day 2019 was “fantastic.”

Participants slowly looking at The Snail by Henri Matisse

They organized two one-hour slow looking sessions split between two artworks and, then, after the sessions, the team invited the visitors to come together for tea, coffee, biscuits, and a discussion about the whole experience.

Here’s what some of the participants said:

“A really interesting session. I’m more mindful of how to observe art in the future.”

“What a wonderful idea!

“I understand now how you can spend so much time in a gallery looking at art!”

“The combination of looking at art slowly and with other people is a real eye opener.”

“Really like the concept. As someone who can feel a bit intimidated by the art world this felt like a really nice way in and gives me more confidence to engage with art in the future.”

“A brilliant concept, lovely to think that this is going on all around the world.”

“I will definitely bring friends next time. Do it again!”

“I felt like a part of a group/community and was an hour well spent.”

“We can’t wait for next year to do it again,” said Adriana Oliveira, Visitor Experience Manager there at Tate Modern.

Phil

Multi-sensory Slow Art Day at BOZAR

BOZAR Center of Fine Arts in Brussels, Belgium hosted participants ages 10 to 70 in their multi-sensory 4th annual Slow Art Day in 2019.

Attendees focused on the exhibition Bernard van Orley: Brussels and the Renaissance, where they meditated in front of the rich landscapes within Bernard van Orley’s tapestries while listening to polyphonic renaissance music. Visitors also looked at portraits of the powerful but tragic Margaret of Austria while listening to her life story.

Participants reportedly went home with peaceful smiles.

We love to hear of such creative Slow Art Days, and look forward to BOZAR’s participation in 2020.

Ashley

Belgium Goes Big Again for Slow Art Day

Four different museums and one church will host Slow Art Day across Belgium this Saturday, April 14, 2018.

Katrijn D ‘Hammers, writing in Dutch on the Blog for Faro, a nonprofit cultural center in Brussells that supports museums throughout the country, outlines what’s happening and directs Belgians to go look at art slowly this Saturday.

Here are the five venues with descriptions of their events quoting from Katrijn’s blog post:

  • Red Star Line Museum
    “During Slow Art Day, you zoom in on the paintings by Emigrants from Eugène Laermans and Belgian Emigrants from Louis van Engelen.”
  • Fotomuseum
    “…the Fotomuseum invites you to zoom in on one photo during a 45-minute session.”
  • Saint Paul’s Church
    “…discover The Lamentation of the Zonnekind of Kristo, a beautiful statuette that has been set up in the Kruisweg chapel for several months.”
  • Arentshuis – Groeninge
    “Choose from a Slow Art Talk in the Groeninge Museum, the Sint-Janshospitaal and the Arentshuis (collection presentation Gruuthuse in a gallant company).”
  • BOZAR
    “…a BOZAR guide will give you a few highlights from the Spanish Still Life exhibition and you will have time to ‘enjoy’ paintings by Cotán, Goya, Picasso and Dalí.”

Sounds like a great Slow Art Day across Belgium. If you are in Antwerp, Brussels, or Bruges, I hope you go slow down at one of these events.

To read Katrijn’s post in full, click here.