Drinks & Art for ArtemisSF’s 2nd Slow Art Day

ArtemisSF in San Francisco, California hosted its second Slow Art Day as a virtual event with a focus on the sense of taste (with some drinks to add a little zest).

Their event Ekphrastic Edibles, designed by Ammala Lacroix, re-interpreted two artworks by Maritza Ruiz-Kim as drinks that participants could make at home:

1 – Progress #15 interpreted as Matcha Lemonade: ‘Misterios con Matcha’

2 – Warmer interpreted as Hibiscus Ginger Mocktail: ‘Jamaica Haven’

Participants were provided with written explanations to illustrate the connection between the art and drinks, and were guided through each recipe to make the drinks themselves.

In her description of Progress #15, Ammala Lacroix writes that Ruiz-Kim’s juxtapositioning of coloured triangles highlights “the irony of differentiation”.

Maritza Ruiz-Kim, Progress #15, 6” x 6”, acrylic on panel, 2017, courtesy of the artist.

This theme was reflected in the different states of the lemon in the ‘Misterios con Matcha’ drink (liquid, solid and frozen). “Despite being presented in differing states,” Lacroix writes, “at the end of the day, a lemon remains a lemon”.

‘Misterios con Matcha’ (Matcha Lemonade), Response to Maritza Ruiz-Kim’s Progress #15, ArtemisSF, Photo: Ammala Lacroix

On the other hand, Ruiz-Kim’s Warmer explores the theme of reconciling the divide between past and present through an edited collage of digitally layered pictures taken by the artist’s paternal grandfather in New Mexico. Lacroix writes, “Maritza Ruiz-Kim tells the story of her family by creating soft pink landscapes informed by the past but seen through new eyes.”

Maritza Ruiz-Kim, Warmer, 14” x 16”, Digital C-print, 2019, courtesy the artist.

The ‘Jamaica Haven’ drink connects to the artwork Warmer through its colors and inclusion of traditional Mexican ingredients like hibiscus.

‘Jamaica Haven’ (Hibiscus Ginger Mocktail), Response to Maritza Ruiz-Kim’s Warmer, ArtemisSF, Photo: Ammala Lacroix

The event had 25 participants on Slow Art Day itself and received strongly positive feedback. It has since been viewed by over 60 participants asynchronously.

Participant Torange Yeghiazarian, Founding Artistic Director at Golden Thread Productions, said that she “loved the drink recipes” and appreciated learning about their inspiration from Ruiz-Kim’s art. Patty Tsai, Senior Associate Director at Columbia Alumni Association Arts Access also loved it and hoped to promote it to her group.

On April 26th, ArtemisSF also hosted additional virtual ‘see’ and ‘hear’ events involving activities such as a Zoom poetry reading in connection with the ‘taste’ event for Slow Art Day. Invitations for all events were designed by Ruiz-Kim.

At Slow Art Day HQ we love seeing such a beautiful focus on the senses in connection with virtual art, and very much look forward to ArtemisSF’s continued creativity and participation next year.

-Johanna

The Power Plant Hosts Fourth Slow Art Day, Virtually

The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery in Toronto, Canada hosted its fourth Slow Art Day this year – and its first virtual slow looking event given Covid-19.

The virtual event highlighted four artworks from the Winter 2020 exhibitions:

God’s Reptilian Finger by Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa
Cacaxte no. 2 (Sarvelia) by Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa
Spectre (La Teleferica) by Dawit L. Petros
Anxious Audience by Rashid Johnson

Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa, ​God’s Reptilian Finger​, 2015-20. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2020. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.
Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa, Cacaxte no. 2 (Sarvelia), 2020. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2020. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.
Dawit L. Petros, Spectre (La Teleferica), 2020. Installation view: The Power Plant, Toronto, 2020. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.
Rashid Johnson, Untitled (Anxious Audience), 2016. Courtesy of artist, Hauser & Wirth and David Kordansky Gallery. Photo: Martin Parsekian.

Laura Demers, TD Curator of Education and Outreach Fellow, wrote a series of prompts that were posted online, alongside close-up photos highlighting specific details in the four artworks. Viewers across the globe were invited to respond to these prompts, either by sharing their impressions in writing (stories, lists, poems, short paragraphs, or social media comments) or by engaging in small multi-sensory activities at home.

The downloadable PDF from the event is permanently posted on their website for participants to continue to use at their own pace. 

Laura mentioned that the event was so well received that it produced over 350 new Instagram followers, and thousands of likes from the community across all of their social media accounts.

Josh Heuman, Curator of Education & Public Programs at The Power Plant, writes that:

“In little ways, this COVID-19 pandemic is pushing us to re-think how we might use online platforms to think beyond the four walls of The Power Plant.”

We are encouraged by the creative responses to the challenge of hosting virtual events during these difficult times, and look forward to The Power Plant’s continued participation in 2021.

– Johanna and Ashley

Slow Art Day is today – and it’s virtual!

All over the world, Slow Art Day is still being celebrated today, from South Africa to Stockholm, Mexico to Melbourne, Boston to Budapest, and this year we are shifting to unique virtual techniques to help us all mindfully slow down.

In preparation for this year, we hosted a virtual webinar – with participants from several continents – about how to run a virtual Slow Art Day amidst this Covid-19 crisis. A number of organizations are experimenting with different formats, including live online sessions, asynchronous techniques, and social-media-based approaches.

Here at the Slow Art Day HQ we are really excited about all the events and hope to join several this year, virtually.

In the upcoming weeks, we will be posting reports from all the events.

An in-person Slow Art Day event is currently being planned for September. Stay tuned!

Have a great day looking at art slowly and virtually.

-Phil, Maggie, Ashley, Johanna

Slow Art Day Zoom Training

Last Sunday we continued our collaboration with museums from around the world and had a great session about how to use Zoom to run a virtual Slow Art Day event.

Watch the discussion below:

Or, you can also read a summary of the training .

We look forward to seeing these museums use Zoom as a platform for their wonderful virtual Slow Art Day events despite the Covid-19 crisis.

– Johanna

How to run a virtual Slow Art Day?

We just gathered museums from around the world and had a great roundtable discussion about how to run a virtual Slow Art Day amidst this Covid-19 crisis.

Watch the discussion below:

Or, you can also read a summary of some of the key questions and ideas as compiled by our Slow Art Day intern Johanna Bokedal.

This Sunday, March 29 at 11am NYC time, we plan to run a Zoom training session for educators and curators and others involved in virtual Slow Art Day planning. If you want to join that, then respond to this post in the comments (we’ll also be inviting hosts via email).

– Phil

Virtual Slow Art Day

Edward Hopper, Morning Sun, 1952, Columbus Museum of Art

As more and more museums, galleries, and cultural centers around the world or choosing to or are required to close their physical locations given the rapidly escalating situation around Covid-19, many of our host institutions are scaling up their digital presence.

Some of our hosts are planning to offer virtual Slow Art Day events on April 4, for anyone from around the world to take part in. To see a list of virtual Slow Art Day events, click here and look for events marked “VIRTUAL EVENT.” More virtual events will be added in the coming weeks.

We hope you’ll join be able to join us virtually for some slow looking on April 4. If you’re interested in organizing a virtual Slow Art Day event, get in touch.

– The Slow Art Day team

Slow Art Day 2020 in light of Covid-19 – a note to the Slow Art Day community

In light of the rapidly escalating global situation around COVID-19, we at Slow Art Day HQ reached out to our global network of hosts to find out whether 1) they were still planning to proceed with their scheduled event on April 4, and, if not, 2) whether we should postpone Slow Art Day to a later date this year.

We heard from many of our hosts that given their particular circumstances – size, location, audience – they plan to proceed with Slow Art Day on Saturday, April 4. However, many of our hosts have also been forced to or chosen to cancel their events. Given the approximately 50/50 split in responses, we have decided to go ahead with Slow Art Day on April 4, with only those venues which feel comfortable hosting an event continuing to take part.

For venues which have already cancelled, or will be forced to cancel in the coming weeks, we will schedule a second Slow Art Day later in the year. We do not know exactly when this alternate date will be, as we cannot say when things will be back to normal on a global level. We are, however, tentatively hoping to schedule for a Saturday in late September or early October.

Please check the list of 2020 venues to see which individual events have been cancelled for now and which are going ahead on April 4. This list will be updated continuously.

As many of our hosts reminded us, we all benefit from art and access to art, even and perhaps especially in times of public crisis. We hope you are in a safe place where you will be able to join a nearby Slow Art Day event on April 4. That being said, we also urge you to exercise an abundance of caution when deciding whether to take part in public gatherings.

We wish you all a safe, healthy and happy Slow Art Day, either on April 4 or on a date TBD.

Please get in touch with us if you have any questions, comments, or concerns.

– The Slow Art Day team

Slow Art Day 2019 Annual Report

As we prepare for Slow Art Day 2020, we have finished our 2019 report with host summaries from around the world.

If you would like to review the full report, you can
download it here (PDF – 14MB).

Highlights 

  • SFMOMA hosted a ticketed lunch and slow viewing session, which sold out 
  • Chicago Art Institute trained young people to be docents for Slow Art Day engaging young people in a new way that gives them ownership over the experience 
  • Brazil’s largest foundation of contemporary art, Inhotim, hosted its first Slow Art Day 
  • Toronto hosted more Slow Art Day events than any city around the world 
  • Many venues held daylong events with food, music, dancing, and lots of slow viewing (check out this video from Ur Mara Museoa in the Basque country
  • Multi-sensory sessions took off around the world (close to 25% of reporting museums did some multi-sensory work, as you can see below) 
  • Phil Terry, Founder, delivered a keynote about Slow Art Day at a Toronto inclusive design conference  
  • Phil and the team started visiting cities (Toronto and Philadelphia to begin with) to bring together educators and curators to strengthen the community and share best practices 

We also continued to receive great press attention including from The BBCThe Art NewspaperSmithsonian Magazine, and many local and regional offline and online newspapers, radio, and television. 

Again, to read the full report including summaries from around the world, download our 2019 Annual Report here (PDF-14MB).

We look forward to celebrating our 10th anniversary with you in 2020. Thank you for all you have done to make possible the 1,500 total Slow Art Day events over the years on every continent and land mass except for Greenland (who is up for Greenland this year?). 

Best,  

Phil, Ashley, Maggie, Johanna and the whole Slow Art Day central volunteer team 

PS –

If you haven’t already, you can register for 2020 participation via this link: https://www.slowartday.com/be-a-host

MIT List Visual Arts Center Hosts Sixth Slow Art Day

MIT List Visual Arts Center hosted its sixth Slow Art Day, the third led by Emily Garner, Public Programs Manager.

The event highlighted three sculptures by artists Kathleen Ryan and Kapwani Kiwanga. Participants were given a self-guided prompt sheet that suggested ways to compare and contrast the selected works. This was followed by a public talk inviting participants to discuss the works and their experience of slow-looking.

A group of visitors look at Kathleen Ryan’s sculptures at the MIT List Visual Arts Center (Courtesy MIT List Visual Arts Center)

“We are always pleased to see the visitors give time that the works demand!”

Emily Garner, Public Programs Manager

Emily mentioned that she and her colleagues “are thrilled to participate in this global event amongst some great art institutions,” and we look forward to their participation in 2020.

– Ashley

Hugs at Hawaii State Art Museum’s Fourth Slow Art Day

Hawaii State Art Museum hosted it’s fourth Slow Art Day in 2019, led by two museum guides who work for the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts (SFCA) arts education program.

The guides led two groups of participants through different slow-looking exercises. One group focused on portraits using Visual Thinking Strategies as prompts. The other group focused on narratives they developed while slowly looking at three selected artworks.

Afterward, participants were encouraged to share their observations and thoughts with each other, and all were given a card with Visual Thinking Strategy prompts to take home with them.

Photo of group in gallery – STATE OF ART: new work exhibit.
Photo Credit: State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. 
Photo of group by “Portrait of Edith Kanaka`ole” by Willson Stamper, oil painting, 1980. Art in Public Places Collection of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts.
Photo Credit: State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. 

Mamiko Carroll, Public Information Officer for the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, reported:

People who were total strangers at the beginning were sharing deep thoughts and feelings with each other at the end. Some of the participants even hugged each other goodbye!

We love to hear how Slow Art Day can bring people together around meaningfully shared experiences of slowly enjoying art, and look forward to Hawaii State Art Museum’s participation in 2020.

– Ashley